Announcements

 

 

 

Sweet Briar College is a liberal arts college for women of consequence, located in the foothills of Virginia’s Blue Ridge Mountains approximately 12 miles north of Lynchburg and 54 miles south of Charlottesville. Founded in 1901, the College boasts a modern core curriculum focused on women’s leadership in the 21st century and undergraduate programs in the arts, sciences and humanities, as well as a Master of Arts in Teaching. It is one of only two women’s colleges in the United States with an ABET‐accredited engineering degree. As an Equal Opportunity Employer, Sweet Briar College is committed to enhancing our community and encourages applications from qualified individuals with varied backgrounds, experiences and ideas who would increase the diversity of the College.

 

Job Title: Visiting Assistant Professor of Archaeology and Classics

 

Classification: One‐year, full‐time, benefits eligible, faculty position

 

Reports To: Division Chair, Social Sciences and Humanities

 

Job Summary/Objective: Sweet Briar College invites applications for a one‐year Visiting Assistant Professor position in archaeology and classics, beginning in mid‐August 2018. The strongest candidate will hold the Ph.D. in classical archaeology or a closely related field. Ideally, the candidate will also have experience teaching undergraduates Latin, but it is not required. The candidate must be competent to teach Roman and Greek civilization courses at the 200‐level to both majors and non‐majors. The candidate will teach three courses during both the fall and spring twelve‐week terms (September 17 - December 14, 2018; and January 15 - April 15, 2019). Candidates ready to work with a diverse student body are especially welcome. Sweet Briar prides itself on creating a learning environment that encourages young women to fulfill their highest potential. Leadership in all walks of life is fostered by the special connections our faculty make with their students, and Sweet Briar women translate their academic experiences into interesting and important lives.

 

Required Qualifications: The successful applicant will hold a Ph.D.; experience teaching Latin preferred; competency in teaching Roman and Greek civilization courses at the 200-level.

 

How to Apply: Applications should be sent in a single PDF file by email to classicalarchaeology@sbc.edu and should include: 1) a Sweet Briar College employment application; 2) cover letter; 3) CV; and 4) the names and full contact information for three professional references. Review of applications will begin immediately and continue until the position is filled.

 

 


 

 

 

The Department of Classical Studies at The College of Wooster invites applications for a full-time Visiting Assistant Professor of Classical Studies or Ancient History for spring semester 2019. The teaching load will be three courses and will include Latin language, Ancient Greek History, and a Special Topics course in Ancient History. A Ph.D. in Classics or Ancient History is required.


Applicants should submit a cover letter, curriculum vitae, copies of unofficial graduate transcripts, teaching statement, research statement, diversity statement, and three letters of reference through Interfolio @ http://apply.interfolio.com/51000. The diversity statement should detail how the applicant has engaged and/or expects to engage with issues of diversity in the classroom and the curriculum as well as on campus and in the broader community. The College of Wooster enrolls a diverse student body (20% domestic students of color and 11% international students); applicants should have experience with diverse student populations.


Questions may be sent to Dr. Josephine Shaya, Chair of the Department of Classical Studies (jshaya@wooster.edu). Review of applications will begin on June 5, 2018 and will continue until the position is filled.


The College of Wooster is an independent college of the liberal arts and sciences with a commitment to excellence in undergraduate education. The College values diversity, strives to attract qualified women and minority candidates, and encourages individuals belonging to these groups to apply. Wooster seeks to ensure diversity by its policy of employing persons without regard to age, sex, color, race, creed, religion, national origin, disability, veteran status, sexual orientation, gender identity and expression, or political affiliation. The College of Wooster is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer. Employment is subject to federal laws requiring verification of identity and legal right to work in the United States as required by the Immigration Reform and Control Act. The College of Wooster is a drug-free workplace.

 

 


 

 

 

 

Institute for Advanced Study

Opportunitites for Scholars for the Academic Year 2019-2020


The Institute for Advanced Study is an independent private institution founded in 1930 to create a community of scholars focused on intellectual inquiry, free from teaching and other university obligations. Each year scholars from around the world apply to come to the Institute to pursue their own research. Those who are chosen are offered a membership for a set period. Members receive access to the extensive resources of the Institute, including offices, access to libraries, subsidized restaurant and housing facilities, and some secretarial services.

 

THE SCHOOL OF HISTORICAL STUDIES supports scholarship in all fields of historical research, but is concerned principally with the history of western, near eastern and Asian civilizations, with particular emphasis upon Greek and Roman civilization, the history of Europe (medieval, early modern, and modern), the Islamic world, East Asian studies, art history, the history of science and philosophy and modern international relations. The School also offers the Edward T. Cone Membership in Music Studies. Each year the School welcomes approximately forty Members selected on the basis of both external and internal review. Most are working on topics in the above mentioned fields, but each year the School also selects some scholars working in other areas of historical research. Members in the School are appointed for either one term (first term Sept. 23 to Dec. 20, second term Jan. 13 to April 10) or for two terms, amounting to a full academic year.

 

ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS include the Ph.D. (or equivalent) at the time of application and a substantial record of publication. The School takes into account the stage of the scholar’s academic career when considering the list of publications, but in general applicants should have at least several articles already published in scholarly publications in order to be considered eligible. Qualified candidates of any nationality are invited to apply. Scholars are not required to have a current institutional affiliation.

 

MEMBERS ARE REQUIRED to remain in residence in Princeton during term time. Members’ only other obligation is to pursue their own research. If they wish, they may also participate in seminars and meetings within the Institute, and there are ample opportunities for contacts with scholars at nearby universities.

 

INSTITUTE STIPENDS will normally be offered up to a maximum of $75,000 for the full academic year, or $37,500 for one term. A few senior scholars will be offered additional funding to help make up for losses in salary. Stipends may be supplemented by other grants, including sabbatical salaries, but if the total exceeds the salary at the time of application the Institute stipend will be reduced accordingly. Scholars with full sabbatical funding, other grants, retirement funding, or other means may apply for a non-stipendiary membership. Institute stipends are intended to replace lost salary to fund Members; they are not intended to pay for teaching replacements in Members’ home institutions. A few Assistant Professors who meet additional eligibility requirements will be selected for Mellon Fellowships that will provide full year support matching their salaries and benefits at the time of application. Detailed information about this program is on the website: https://www.hs.ias.edu/mellon. Some short-term visitorships (for less than a full term, and without stipend) are also available on an ad-hoc basis. To inquire contact the Administrative Officer as indicated below.

 

FUNDING FOR MEMBERS comes from a variety of sources. The Center for Spain in America supports one John Elliott Member pursuing research in the history and culture of Early Modern Spain. The Patricia Crone membership supports one scholar working in the field of Near Eastern Studies. The Edward T. Cone membership annually supports one scholar in Music Studies. A Gerda Henkel membership will be offered to one scholar from the European Union, and there are other named memberships that are not tied to any specific field or nationality. Some Members will also be supported by the Institute's own endowment or through foundation grants. The School also welcomes scholars sponsored by the ACLS through the Frederick Burkhardt Fellowships for recently tenured professors. (To apply see: https://www.acls.org/programs/burkhardt/.) Specific sources of funding will be determined after scholars have been selected.

 

Further information and membership application materials may be found on the School’s web site, www.hs.ias.edu. (Updated application materials for the 2018-2019 academic year will be posted there in early June.) Inquiries may be sent by email to the Administrative Officer at mzelazny@ias.edu or by post to: School of Historical Studies, Institute for Advanced Study, 1 Einstein Drive, Princeton, New Jersey 08540. Completed membership applications must be submitted by October 15, 2018.

 

 


 

 

 

AMERICAN SCHOOL OF CLASSICAL STUDIES AT ATHENS
http://www.ascsa.edu.gr/

STUDY IN GREECE 2018-2019


ASCSA PROGRAMS AND FELLOWSHIPS

The American School of Classical Studies at Athens, one of America’s most distinguished centers devoted to advanced teaching and research, was founded in 1881 to provide American graduate students and scholars a base for their studies in the history and civilization of the Greek world. Today, over 135 years later, it is still a teaching institution, providing graduate students a unique opportunity to study firsthand the sites and monuments of Greece. The School is also a superb resource for senior scholars pursuing research in many fields ranging from prehistoric to modern Greece, thanks to its internationally renowned libraries, the Blegen, focusing on all aspects of Greece from its earliest prehistory to late antiquity, and the Gennadius, which concentrates on the Greek world after the end of antiquity. (Note: For the 2018-2019 academic year, the Blegen and Gennadius libraries may be closed for up to six months between January and June for reorganization; members of the School will continue to have access to other facilities of the School and other libraries in Athens).

 

NEH FELLOWSHIPS: Awards for postdoctoral scholars and professionals in the humanities. Terms: Two to four fellowships, five to ten months in duration. Maximum stipend for a five-month project, $21,000; for a ten-month project, $42,000. School fees are waived. U.S. citizens or foreign nationals being U.S. residents for three years before application deadline. Applicants must hold their Ph.D. or equivalent terminal degree at the time of application. Submit online application to ASCSA. DEADLINE: OCTOBER 31, 2018.

 

For more information, please visit http://www.ascsa.edu.gr/index.php/admission-membership/fellowships-and-grants

ASCSA programs are generally open to qualified students and scholars at colleges or universities in the U.S. or Canada; restrictions may apply for specific fellowships and programs. The American School of Classical Studies at Athens does not discriminate on the basis of race, age, sex, sexual orientation, color, religion, ethnic origin, or disability when considering admission to any form of membership.

 


 

 

 

Communal Responses to Local Disaster: Economic, Environmental, Political, Religious

The Thirteenth Biennial meeting of Shifting Frontiers in Late Antiquity

March 14-17, 2019

Claremont McKenna College, Claremont, California

 

The Society for Late Antiquity is pleased to announce the thirteenth biennial meeting of Shifting Frontiers in Late Antiquity, to be held at Claremont McKenna College, in Claremont, California. Specialists in art and archaeology, literature and philology, history and religious studies, working on topics from the 3 rd to the 8 th century CE, are invited to submit paper proposals. Scholars with any related interest are invited to attend.


The 2019 meeting will examine the impact of disasters on late-antique communities, including their susceptibility to disaster, the means by which they coped, and factors that increased resilience and facilitated recovery from disasters. In order to foster the thematic breadth and interdisciplinary perspective for which Shifting Frontiers is known, we invite papers concerned with the full range of traumatic events, and also long-term processes, that could distress communities: economic, environmental, political and religious. The aim of this conference is to move beyond the descriptive and stimulate analytical and theoretical approaches to understanding how distressed communities behaved in the short and long term. Local communities developed daily and seasonal rhythms to mitigate vulnerabilities and fragility. The dread of disaster shaped the late-antique psyche and, in some ways, the cultural landscape of communities. And disasters of various kinds had a wide range of impacts, depending upon severity and the nature of communal resilience. We encourage papers to consider the extent to which the economic, cultural, political or religious resources of communities (or their lack) determined levels of susceptibility, impact, response or resilience. To what extent do late-antique sources acknowledge vulnerability and fragility? What mechanisms created durability and resilience? What were the emotional and intellectual responses to disaster? Does an awareness of the psychological impact of fragility and disaster alter our interpretation of various forms of evidence in Late Antiquity?


We are also very pleased to announce that the keynote lectures this year will be given by Kyle Harper (University of Oklahoma) and Laura Nasrallah (Harvard University)


Conference details may be found at https://www.cmc.edu/history/shifting-frontiers- in-late- antiquity

 

Potential topics include:
 Economic trauma and its impact (fiscal, commercial, etc.)
 Environmental distress and disaster relief (volcanos, earthquakes, tsunamis, etc.)
 Attitudes toward the environment owing to fragility and the potential for disaster
 Alimentary and agricultural disasters (famine, drought, interrupted shipping)
 Urban disasters (fires, rioting, siege)
 Military disasters on the battlefield
 Philosophical and ethical notions of mortality, inevitability and causation connected to disaster
 Rhetorical exploitation and literary responses to, or explorations of disaster

 Philological footprints in language and idiom related to disaster
 Representations of, and psychological responses to disaster in art
 Archaeological and architectural evidence of disasters
 Religious explanations of disaster and liturgical and cultic responses
 Differentiation between sudden, cataclysmic and long-term, slow moving disasters
 The memory of specific events


Proposals for 20-minute presentations should clearly explain the relationship of the paper to the conference theme, describe the evidence to be examined and offer tentative conclusions. Abstracts of no more than 500 words (not including optional bibliography) should be submitted by October 1, 2018. Please submit abstracts as a Word document attached to an email to both Shane Bjornlie (sbjornlie@cmc.edu) and Michelle Berenfeld (michelle_berenfeld@pitzer.edu). Please do not embed proposals in the text of the email. The conference steering committee will review all proposals, starting October 1, with accepted papers receiving notification by November 15. Due to budgetary constraints, bursaries for expenses will not be available, although conference registration fees will be waived for participants presenting papers and for the chairs of sessions. Registration for all other participants will be $100 US.


Conference schedule:
 Abstracts due: October 1, 2018
 Notification of participants: November 15, 2018
 Program published on website with conference instructions and open registration for
participants not presenting papers: December 1, 2018
 Conference convenes: March 14, 2019


Principal conference organizer: Shane Bjornlie (Claremont McKenna College)


Conference steering committee: Michelle Berenfeld (Pitzer College), Cavan Concannon (University of Southern California), Beth Digeser (UC Santa Barbara), Nicola Denzey Lewis (Claremont Graduate University), Michele Salzman (UC Riverside), Edward Watts (UC San Diego) and Ken Wolf (Pomona College)

 

 


 

 

 

 

Arline Custer Memorial Award Call for Submissions

DEADLINE: July 31, 2018

The Arline Custer Memorial Award is presented by the MARAC Arline Custer Memorial Award Committee. This award honors the memory of Arline Custer (1909-1975), MARAC member and editor of the National Union Catalog of Manuscript Collections.

Eligibility
The Arline Custer Memorial Award recognizes the best books and articles written or compiled by individuals and institutions in the MARAC region – the District of Columbia, Delaware, Maryland, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Virginia and West Virginia.

Works under consideration include, but are not limited to: monographs, popular narratives, reference works and exhibition catalogs using archival sources.

Individuals or institutions may submit up to two works published between July 1, 2017 and June 30, 2018.

Evaluation
Works must be relevant to the general public as well as the archival community. They also should be original and well researched using available sources. In addition, they should be clearly presented, well written and organized. Visual materials, if used, should be appropriate to the text.

Preference will be given to works by archivists.

Award
Up to two awards may be given, with a maximum value of $200.00 for books and $100.00 for articles.
The 2018 award(s) will be announced at the Fall 2018 Conference in Wilmington, DE.

Submission Instructions
Please send two copies of each submission with a letter of nomination to the Senior Co-Chair of the Arline Custer Memorial Award Committee:

Tara Wink
Health Sciences and Human Services Library
University of Maryland, Baltimore
601 West Lombard Street
Baltimore, MD 21201-1512

Email: twink@hshsl.umaryland.edu

Entries must be received by July 31, 2018

For additional information about this award and a list of previous award winners, see the Arline Custer Memorial Award site:
http://www.marac.info/arline-custer-memorial-award

 

 


 

 

 

Got Latin? Got Greek?

 

Linguistic preparation is crucial for success in many fields of graduate study. Students must command the languages of their primary sources in order to pursue valid research. But the opportunity to establish the competence in Ancient Greek or Latin needed for graduate work in Classics or related fields doesn’t always open up early enough within undergraduate programs. The Department of Classical Studies of Loyola University Chicago now offers a Post-Baccalaureate program so that students who have completed bachelor’s degrees may build the proficiency their further careers demand. Coursework at the post-baccalaureate level also introduces some of the scholarship of Classical texts in which graduate study engages. Post-Baccalaureate students become able to clarify their professional goals while they sharpen their technical skills and become better qualified to advance on the path they choose.

 

Loyola’s Post-Baccalaureate Certificate program in Classical Studies is shaped in terms of competence attained, rather than a fixed period of study. The Certificate will be awarded to students who successfully complete two semesters totaling 18 “target” credit-hours at the 300-level in both Classical languages with a GPA of 3.0 in the program. “Target” study in these two semesters should include at least 6 credit-hours in 300-level ancient Greek author-courses and at least 6 credit-hours in 300-level Latin author-courses. We recognize some students will have attained intermediate or advanced competence in both languages before their post-baccalaureate study and will need only two semesters of target-level work; some may have had the opportunity to become proficient in one Classical language but have weaker preparation in the other; some may need to begin their study of both languages and will need additional coursework to complete the Certificate. Our program will meet you where you are in your own career of study, and work with you to bring your skills and knowledge up to the next stage.

 

Faculty in the Department hold Ph.D.s in Classical Studies from top-ranked North American and British universities. Their research specialties include Greek and Roman literature, history, religion, and archaeology; papyrology; textual criticism; feminist approaches to the Classics; and literary theory. Individual students’ curriculums will be determined in collaboration with the Department’s Post-Baccalaureate Program Director. To learn more, please visit our web-pages at www.luc.edu/classicalstudies. Inquiries can be directed to Dr. Greg Dobrov, the Post-Baccalaureate Program Director (gdobrov@luc.edu).

 

Candidates for the Post-Baccalaureate Certificate Program in Classical Studies should have:

Bachelor’s degree in hand at the time of matriculation in the program and, normally, a minimum undergraduate GPA of 3.0


They should submit in their applications:


On-line applications can be submitted at www.luc.edu/gpem; inquiries GradApp@luc.edu.

 

 


 

 

 

Master of Arts in of Latin
Kent State University


The Classics faculty of the Department of Modern and Classical Language Studies at Kent State University in Kent, Ohio are happy to announce that the Master of Arts program in Latin Literature has recently become a fully online, asynchronous program, which will make it available to students anywhere who wish to earn an advanced degree in Latin. The goal of the program is to give students graduate level training in the Latin language, as well other relevant fields such as literature, culture, archaeology and history.

 

The majority of courses in the program are graduate-level Latin courses. Students entering the program will be expected to have completed several upper division undergraduate courses in Latin.

 

The program is designed to be completed in two years if students take a full-time load (3 courses per semester). Courses are offered on a two-year rotation, so part-time students who are not taking a full-time load can take the courses they need in a timely manner.


One graduate assistantship per year will be awarded to an eligible applicant; candidates for the graduate assistantship must be full time students and be able to travel regularly to the Kent State main campus during the period of their award.


Admission Requirements: Official transcript, goal statement, three letters of recommendation which specifically address the candidate’s Latin experience, and a writing sample. International students must also provide proof of English language proficiency. For details and an application see the Kent State Graduate Studies admission website (http://www.kent.edu/graduatestudies/admissions)


Questions about the program or requests for additional information should be addressed to Professor Jennifer Larson (jlarson@kent.edu)

 

 


 

Home | Membership | Meetings | Publications | Contact webmaster

AAH Logo