Announcements

 

 

Getty Scholar Grants are for established scholars, or writers who have attained distinction in their fields. Recipients are in residence at the Getty Research Institute or Getty Villa, where they pursue their own projects free from academic obligations, make use of Getty collections, join their colleagues in a weekly meeting devoted to an annual research theme, and participate in the intellectual life of the Getty. Two themes will be offered in 2020/2021, one each at the Getty Research Institute in Westwood, Los Angeles, CA, and one at the Getty Villa in Malibu, CA.

 

1. The Fragment (Research Institute, Los Angeles, CA)

The 2020/2021 academic year at the Getty Research Institute will be devoted to the fragment. Issues regarding the fragment have been present since the beginning of art history and archaeology. Many objects of study survive in physically fragmented forms, and any object, artwork, or structure may be conceived of as a fragment of a broader cultural context. As such, fragments catalyze the investigative process of scholarship and the fundamental acts of the historian: conservation, reconstruction, and interpretation. The evolution of an object—its material and semiotic changes across time, space, and cultures—can offer insights into the ethics and technologies of restoration, tastes for incompleteness or completeness, politics of collection and display, and production of art historical knowledge.

 

While the fragment has been described as the central metaphor of modernity and the paradigmatic sign of a contemporary worldview, its history as a trope runs much deeper. Cultures of the fragment have flourished throughout history under such guises as the reuse of architectural parts and the cult of relics, the physical and conceptual image-breakings of iconoclasm, and the aesthetics of repair. Fragmentation can occur through artistic processes, acts of destruction, or forces of nature. It can be willful, accidental, or inevitable, but it is necessarily transformative.

 

Applicants are invited to address both the creation and reception of fragments, their mutability and mobility, and their valuation and consequence throughout history.

 


2. Phoenicians, Philistines, and Canaanites: The Levant and the Classical World (Villa, Malibu, CA)

The Getty Scholars Program at the Villa for the 2020/2021 term will focus on the ancient cultures of the Levant and their relations with the classical world. Lying on the eastern seaboard of the Mediterranean, the Levant was a crucial crossroads between the classical world of Greece and Rome and the kingdoms of the Near East. Home to the ancient peoples of Phoenicia, Ugarit, Canaan, Philistia, Jordan, Israel, and Judah, this region participated in a vibrant Bronze-Age network of trade that flourished for many centuries until a combination of warfare, migration and famine around 1200 BCE destroyed these palace societies.

 

In the first millennium BCE, a Greek-Phoenician rivalry for control of colonies and seaborne trade routes as far west as Spain caused considerable conflict but also bore fruit in the diffusion of alphabetic scripts and cross-influences in literature, mythology, and the arts. The conquest of the Levant by Alexander the Great in 331 BCE and its absorption into Rome in the first century BCE resulted in Greco-Roman style becoming the public face of institutional culture and Greek vying with Aramaic as the vernacular language. Rome, too, was transformed by the encounter, especially through its conflicts with Judaism and the early followers of Christ, which had tumultuous consequences for the Holy Land and the Western world.

 

The application deadline for both programs is October 1, 2019.

 

Detailed instructions, eligibility requirements, and application forms are available online at
http://www.getty.edu/foundation/initiatives/residential/getty_scholars.html.

 

 


 

 

 

The Many Faces of War V: An annual interdisciplinary symposium on the experience and impact of war throughout history
October 17th-18th, 2019 at South Dakota State University


This annual interdisciplinary conference aims to address both the experience and impact of war for those fighting as well as for those on the periphery of combat.


The conference is aimed equally at postgraduate students, researchers in the early stages of their careers and established academics. There are no specific geographical or temporal parameters regarding the subject matter of papers, and scholars and students of ancient, medieval and modern warfare are encouraged to submit proposals. We would also encourage the proposal of panels of three papers.


This year we encourage a focus on veterans and associated studies or experiences. Suggested topics are: PTSD; the social stigma of retreat or cowardice; social security systems for war widows and orphans; the effect of training on a soldier’s mindset and actions (before, during and after combat); the social position of soldiers and veterans; literature and poetry of war; the art and architecture of war and remembrance.


Proposals/abstracts should be no longer than 250 words and should be sent to:
Graham Wrightson (graham.wrightson@sdstate.edu)


The deadline for submission of proposals is August 31, 2019.

 

 


 

 

 

Got Latin? Got Greek?

 

Linguistic preparation is crucial for success in many fields of graduate study. Students must command the languages of their primary sources in order to pursue valid research. But the opportunity to establish the competence in Ancient Greek or Latin needed for graduate work in Classics or related fields doesn’t always open up early enough within undergraduate programs. The Department of Classical Studies of Loyola University Chicago now offers a Post-Baccalaureate program so that students who have completed bachelor’s degrees may build the proficiency their further careers demand. Coursework at the post-baccalaureate level also introduces some of the scholarship of Classical texts in which graduate study engages. Post-Baccalaureate students become able to clarify their professional goals while they sharpen their technical skills and become better qualified to advance on the path they choose.

 

Loyola’s Post-Baccalaureate Certificate program in Classical Studies is shaped in terms of competence attained, rather than a fixed period of study. The Certificate will be awarded to students who successfully complete two semesters totaling 18 “target” credit-hours at the 300-level in both Classical languages with a GPA of 3.0 in the program. “Target” study in these two semesters should include at least 6 credit-hours in 300-level ancient Greek author-courses and at least 6 credit-hours in 300-level Latin author-courses. We recognize some students will have attained intermediate or advanced competence in both languages before their post-baccalaureate study and will need only two semesters of target-level work; some may have had the opportunity to become proficient in one Classical language but have weaker preparation in the other; some may need to begin their study of both languages and will need additional coursework to complete the Certificate. Our program will meet you where you are in your own career of study, and work with you to bring your skills and knowledge up to the next stage.

 

Faculty in the Department hold Ph.D.s in Classical Studies from top-ranked North American and British universities. Their research specialties include Greek and Roman literature, history, religion, and archaeology; papyrology; textual criticism; feminist approaches to the Classics; and literary theory. Individual students’ curriculums will be determined in collaboration with the Department’s Post-Baccalaureate Program Director. To learn more, please visit our web-pages at www.luc.edu/classicalstudies. Inquiries can be directed to Dr. Greg Dobrov, the Post-Baccalaureate Program Director (gdobrov@luc.edu).

 

Candidates for the Post-Baccalaureate Certificate Program in Classical Studies should have:

Bachelor’s degree in hand at the time of matriculation in the program and, normally, a minimum undergraduate GPA of 3.0


They should submit in their applications:


On-line applications can be submitted at www.luc.edu/gpem; inquiries GradApp@luc.edu.

 

 


 

 

 

Master of Arts in of Latin
Kent State University


The Classics faculty of the Department of Modern and Classical Language Studies at Kent State University in Kent, Ohio are happy to announce that the Master of Arts program in Latin Literature has recently become a fully online, asynchronous program, which will make it available to students anywhere who wish to earn an advanced degree in Latin. The goal of the program is to give students graduate level training in the Latin language, as well other relevant fields such as literature, culture, archaeology and history.

 

The majority of courses in the program are graduate-level Latin courses. Students entering the program will be expected to have completed several upper division undergraduate courses in Latin.

 

The program is designed to be completed in two years if students take a full-time load (3 courses per semester). Courses are offered on a two-year rotation, so part-time students who are not taking a full-time load can take the courses they need in a timely manner.


One graduate assistantship per year will be awarded to an eligible applicant; candidates for the graduate assistantship must be full time students and be able to travel regularly to the Kent State main campus during the period of their award.


Admission Requirements: Official transcript, goal statement, three letters of recommendation which specifically address the candidate’s Latin experience, and a writing sample. International students must also provide proof of English language proficiency. For details and an application see the Kent State Graduate Studies admission website (http://www.kent.edu/graduatestudies/admissions)


Questions about the program or requests for additional information should be addressed to Professor Jennifer Larson (jlarson@kent.edu)

 

 


 

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